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  -  Kendrick Lamar Sells 242K Records In First Week (http://www.absolutepunk.net/showthread.php?t=2939942)

Dre Okorley 11/01/12 05:11 PM

Kendrick Lamar Sells 242K Records In First Week
 
Kendrick Lamar's good kid, m.A.A.d city debuted at the #2 spot on Billboard, selling 242,000 records its first week. Not bad for a longtime independent artist who just recently signed to Aftermath Records.

yayitsjoe 11/01/12 05:12 PM

wow.

BuiltToFall 11/01/12 05:24 PM

Bought album on a whim from Amazon for $5. One of my favorite hip hop albums already. It's weird, seeing how I was diabolically opposed to hip hop in high school.

Jeff_Ryan 11/01/12 05:25 PM

kendrick had a dream

Who Is Ryan? 11/01/12 05:28 PM

Congrats!

be mine 11/01/12 05:50 PM

Independent artist?

justbradley 11/01/12 05:51 PM

Just noticed that the new Further Seems Forever album debuted at number 62, which is pretty cool. Not as high, obviously, but still awesome. I actually bought a copy of it at Target this past weekend.

_veges_ 11/01/12 05:53 PM

Awesome news, he deserves it

Dre Okorley 11/01/12 05:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by be mine (Post 114888522)
Independent artist?

That's what I said. Then he signed to Aftermath and released this.

CTRL+ALT+DANCE 11/01/12 06:08 PM

Have heard a lot about him but I never had a chance to really take a listen.
Good for him though!

Jason Tate 11/01/12 06:10 PM

Good album, but man some of the lyrics are so hip hop cliche about women, I have to skip them.

Dre Okorley 11/01/12 06:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jason Tate (Post 114889532)
Good album, but man some of the lyrics are so hip hop cliche about women, I have to skip them.

Those songs -- which are like 2 or 3 out of 16 if I remember correctly, compared to those whose are every track -- are him looking back at himself and mocking the stereotypical misogyny that exists in some hip hop. If you ever want to, you should check out the story behind all of the lyrics on the album. It's conceptual. His mind is really incredible.

Also Glassjaw, anyone? haha.

Jake Jenkins 11/01/12 06:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jason Tate (Post 114889532)
Good album, but man some of the lyrics are so hip hop cliche about women, I have to skip them.

not sure if you get the album, then

Jeff_Ryan 11/01/12 06:34 PM

Yeah this definitely isn't an album you skip tracks on even if you don't like the track in particular.

WhoSaidThat? 11/01/12 06:50 PM

Fantastic.

honkytonk 11/01/12 07:04 PM

Fantastic album, are you guys going to post a review?

Dre Okorley 11/01/12 07:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by honkytonk (Post 114891952)
Fantastic album, are you guys going to post a review?

I was actually signed up for it, but I've been busy and there are some really good reviews on it out there...not sure I can express all of its qualities so thoroughly and eloquently, haha. I passed it on to Drew.

Chris Collum 11/01/12 08:23 PM

Sorry Jason but you might be missing the point..

Redpaperkut 11/01/12 08:24 PM

Rap/Hip-Hop album of the year, no doubt.

Jukebox Romeo 11/01/12 10:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Redpaperkut (Post 114895152)
Rap/Hip-Hop album of the year, no doubt.


FTFY ;-)

taekwondrone 11/02/12 12:05 AM

Such an incredible album. I didn't think he'd top Section.80, but welp. Good for him.

The_Effort 11/02/12 02:10 AM

Good for him. Album is fantastic.

:appl:

Ravelle17 11/02/12 07:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jason Tate (Post 114889532)
Good album, but man some of the lyrics are so hip hop cliche about women, I have to skip them.

I know everyone else mentioned it already, but 1. skipping around the album defeats the point of this album and 2. Kendrick's not promoting misogyny, he's telling a story through the eyes of himself back in high school, before he learned what's "real" and what's bullshit.

On the other hand, I can see if you're frustrated by the constant use of "bish" (bitch), though I don't think he's aiming that at women.

TorontoMatt 11/02/12 07:37 AM

I'm not riding this guy like many of you. He's not that good. He's not that clever. He's not going to say that he chose his own fate, and when came to a fork in the road he went straight.

KidASquared 11/02/12 07:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SophGod (Post 114890152)
not sure if you get the album, then

hah this! it looks like others agree as well

Dre Okorley 11/02/12 08:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TorontoMatt (Post 114905742)
I'm not riding this guy like many of you. He's not that good. He's not that clever. He's not going to say that he chose his own fate, and when came to a fork in the road he went straight.

:rolleyes:

Redpaperkut 11/02/12 08:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jukebox Romeo (Post 114901032)
FTFY ;-)

That could work too.

lilRIPsta 11/02/12 08:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dre Okorley (Post 114889742)
Those songs -- which are like 2 or 3 out of 16 if I remember correctly, compared to those whose are every track -- are him looking back at himself and mocking the stereotypical misogyny that exists in some hip hop. If you ever want to, you should check out the story behind all of the lyrics on the album. It's conceptual. His mind is really incredible.

Also Glassjaw, anyone? haha.


Glassjaw? Huh?

QuietThings430 11/02/12 08:38 AM

Great for him. Easily the best hip hop album of the year.

Dre Okorley 11/02/12 08:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lilRIPsta (Post 114907012)
Glassjaw? Huh?

Everyone always associates hip hop with misogyny as if that's all it's about, but non-hip hop music never gets scrutinized in the same way. Darryl's lyrics in the past, at least, have been pretty degrading whether poetic or personal.

Star Slight 11/02/12 08:57 AM

Good for him

also hip hop cliche about women

Jason Tate 11/02/12 12:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SophGod (Post 114890152)
not sure if you get the album, then


Not sure you understand what I'm talking about, then.

Jason Tate 11/02/12 12:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Debut_Fin (Post 114890652)
Yeah this definitely isn't an album you skip tracks on even if you don't like the track in particular.


Sure it is - I have a big problem with the word "bitch" (see any of LoveAsArson's commentary in the Political Forum) used in this manner. It's hard to listen to ... but thanks for telling me how I should listen to music.

Jason Tate 11/02/12 12:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dre Okorley (Post 114889742)
Those songs -- which are like 2 or 3 out of 16 if I remember correctly, compared to those whose are every track -- are him looking back at himself and mocking the stereotypical misogyny that exists in some hip hop. If you ever want to, you should check out the story behind all of the lyrics on the album. It's conceptual. His mind is really incredible.

Also Glassjaw, anyone? haha.


Sure, link me the concept between repeating "bitch don't kill my vibe" so I can see the incredible mind behind this ... I'm open to reading and learning.

Also, I obviously have long had similar contempt (very publicly) for Glassjaw.

Dre Okorley 11/02/12 12:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jason Tate (Post 114915412)
Sure, link me the concept between repeating "bitch don't kill my vibe" so I can see the incredible mind behind this ... I'm open to reading and learning.

Also, I obviously have long had similar contempt (very publicly) for Glassjaw.

It's not aimed at women, "bitch" is aimed at his competition and the bigwigs in the rap industry.

Dre Okorley 11/02/12 12:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ravelle17 (Post 114904972)
I know everyone else mentioned it already, but 1. skipping around the album defeats the point of this album and 2. Kendrick's not promoting misogyny, he's telling a story through the eyes of himself back in high school, before he learned what's "real" and what's bullshit.

On the other hand, I can see if you're frustrated by the constant use of "bish" (bitch), though I don't think he's aiming that at women.

Sigh, that's why he plays on the word and twists it, he's not using it in that manner. It's not really something that takes that much thinking. He's a genuinely good guy.

lilRIPsta 11/02/12 01:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dre Okorley (Post 114907352)
Everyone always associates hip hop with misogyny as if that's all it's about, but non-hip hop music never gets scrutinized in the same way. Darryl's lyrics in the past, at least, have been pretty degrading whether poetic or personal.



Gotcha, I missed the context of what his Glassjaw comment was about. EYEWTKAS had some mysogynistic lyrics but thats what made it such a powerful break-up album. It captured that moment of anger and heartbreak where all reason, common sense, and political correctness leave and you are left with just poor hate.

Star Slight 11/02/12 01:17 PM

Its the same concept used in OFs music, which he also had a problem with. Dont be surprised

Jukebox Romeo 11/02/12 01:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ravelle17 (Post 114904972)
I know everyone else mentioned it already, but 1. skipping around the album defeats the point of this album and 2. Kendrick's not promoting misogyny, he's telling a story through the eyes of himself back in high school, before he learned what's "real" and what's bullshit.

On the other hand, I can see if you're frustrated by the constant use of "bish" (bitch), though I don't think he's aiming that at women.

Damn, what a terrible article. Not once when listening to this album 20+ times did I feel Kendrick "wants us all to say bitch." I agree, he's not usually aiming it at women and when he does, it's through the eyes of a character in the story.

Jason Tate 11/02/12 01:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dre Okorley (Post 114916082)
It's not aimed at women, "bitch" is aimed at his competition and the bigwigs in the rap industry.

The term itself is what I have an issue with, regardless of its intention being "the industry" or not. Using such a term to degrade anyone continues the trend of this phrase being seeing as ok in our society. I take issue with its use. That said, it's only featured (along with other derogatory terms) in a few songs -- and therefore, easy enough to skip while enjoying the album.

Jason Tate 11/02/12 01:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Star Slight (Post 114917412)
Its the same concept used in OFs music, which he also had a problem with. Dont be surprised

Hiding behind "concept" while propagating antiquated hatred is just ignorant.

Dre Okorley 11/02/12 01:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jason Tate (Post 114918362)
Hiding behind "concept" while propagating antiquated hatred is just ignorant.

Nah, it's not an OF tactic whatsoever. He's not about that at all.

Anyway, I feel like I made my point. I understand you having reservations with the term, but I think it's good to see someone trying to intelligently subvert it to another source, rather than women - it's basically slowly transforming the meaning (but you have to tailor it to an audience who uses it frequently for them to be open to it, in a creative way so that it catches on). I don't know how to explain it without going into more detail, but changing the psycho-sociology of a community isn't easy.

He knows he will reach a wide audience, and when he speaks to the 100,000+ Black youth that look up to him, he'll tell them referring to women degradingly isn't what music or life is about. And if they go "huh?! What about your lyrics?" then he'll explain it exactly as I said- "At one time, but now I haven't once pitted it against women, at all. I was reflecting on my days as a deluded young child in the hood (like yourself)."

I don't think ignoring those from the hood who start to have socially conscious revelations about gender, sex, race, etc is the answer. It's so common, and it isn't fair. One blocks out a lot of powerful voices that way.

Jukebox Romeo 11/02/12 01:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jason Tate (Post 114918332)
The term itself is what I have an issue with, regardless of its intention being "the industry" or not. Using such a term to degrade anyone continues the trend of this phrase being seeing as ok in our society. I take issue with its use. That said, it's only featured (along with other derogatory terms) in a few songs -- and therefore, easy enough to skip while enjoying the album.

I asked you this a while back too but I'm curious if your response has changed: why then, is the word "******" censored on this website but "bitch" is not?

Arry 11/02/12 01:49 PM

Macklemore, and now kendrick. independent hip hop artists are comin up!

Jason Tate 11/02/12 01:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jukebox Romeo (Post 114918482)
I asked you this a while back too but I'm curious if your response has changed: why then, is the word "******" censored on this website but "bitch" is not?

Because we take a very minimal approach to censorship; which I struggle with to begin with.

Jason Tate 11/02/12 02:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dre Okorley (Post 114918452)
Nah, it's not an OF tactic whatsoever. He's not about that at all.

Anyway, I feel like I made my point. I understand you having reservations with the term, but I think it's good to see someone trying to intelligently subvert it to another source, rather than women - it's basically slowing transforming the meaning (but you have to tailor it to an audience who uses it frequently for them to be open to it, in a creative way so that it catches on). I don't know how to explain it without going into more detail, but changing the psycho-sociology of a community isn't easy.

This is the same argument people try to make with the term "gay" or "retarded" or "***" - and I disagree on a fundamental level that it's transforming the meaning. The meaning is still completely intact. In this case the term is being used to degrade a group of people (competition? industry?) by calling back to the fact that the term is, inherently, degrading and negative. The association remains regardless of who is being targeted, and I believe it takes a certain level of logical gymnastics to assume that the vast majority of those listening to the music will not draw a parallel between talking down to someone ... and the word's association with the degradation of woman. The song, impact, and lyrics can still carry the author's intended weight without having to resort to using these kinds of words ... that's my personal opinion on the matter. We all interact and respond to art differently, I have strong feelings on the weight and power of words -- so I respond viscerally to them.

Dre Okorley 11/02/12 02:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jason Tate (Post 114918962)
This is the same argument people try to make with the term "gay" or "retarded" or "***" - and I disagree on a fundamental level that it's transforming the meaning. The meaning is still completely intact. In this case the term is being used to degrade a group of people (competition? industry?) by calling back to the fact that the term is, inherently, degrading and negative. The association remains regardless of who is being targeted, and I believe it takes a certain level of logical gymnastics to assume that the vast majority of those listening to the music will not draw a parallel between talking down to someone ... and the word's association with the degradation of woman. The song, impact, and lyrics can still carry the author's intended weight without having to resort to using these kinds of words ... that's my personal opinion on the matter. We all interact and respond to art differently, I have strong feelings on the weight and power of words -- so I respond viscerally to them.

I added to my response above. Thoughts?

Dre Okorley 11/02/12 02:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jason Tate (Post 114918962)
This is the same argument people try to make with the term "gay" or "retarded" or "***" - and I disagree on a fundamental level that it's transforming the meaning. The meaning is still completely intact. In this case the term is being used to degrade a group of people (competition? industry?) by calling back to the fact that the term is, inherently, degrading and negative. The association remains regardless of who is being targeted, and I believe it takes a certain level of logical gymnastics to assume that the vast majority of those listening to the music will not draw a parallel between talking down to someone ... and the word's association with the degradation of woman. The song, impact, and lyrics can still carry the author's intended weight without having to resort to using these kinds of words ... that's my personal opinion on the matter. We all interact and respond to art differently, I have strong feelings on the weight and power of words -- so I respond viscerally to them.

Also, you don't believe in words losing power as far as cognitive linguistics is concerned? With something like "bish" that has no historically negative associations with it, I find it hard to believe that it would carry the same weight as anything of supposed similarity.

Jason Tate 11/02/12 02:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dre Okorley (Post 114919142)
I added to my response above. Thoughts?

He knows he will reach a wide audience, and when he speaks to the 100,000+ Black youth that look up to him, he'll tell them referring to women degradingly isn't what music or life is about. And if they go "huh?! What about your lyrics?" then he'll explain it exactly as I said- "At one time, but now I haven't once pitted it against women, at all. I was reflecting on my days as a deluded young child in the hood (like yourself)."

I don't think ignoring those from the hood who start to have socially conscious revelations about gender, sex, race, etc is the answer. It's so common, and it isn't fair. One blocks out a lot of powerful voices that way.

Is this posted on his website for people to read? Has he written this somewhere so people aren't having to ask him? I'd like to read this, if it is. Because if more than 1% of the people that listen to this music ever get the chance to personally ask him his thoughts and the meaning behind using such terms, I would be absolutely shocked. Furthermore, just because that's his reasoning behind using the term - doesn't also make it right in my mind. The same way I take issue with people saying the word "retarded" has changed.

I don't think ignoring those "from the hood" is the answer either ... never once have I advocated for that. But it's important what those powerful voices are actually saying, and how their words are being actually interpreted.

Star Slight 11/02/12 02:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jason Tate (Post 114918362)
Hiding behind "concept" while propagating antiquated hatred is just ignorant.


Hiding, art, 1960s etc