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  -  Anton Kellner and the Lone Stars - Sequences (http://www.absolutepunk.net/showthread.php?t=2965082)

Gregory Robson 11/27/12 09:25 AM

Anton Kellner and the Lone Stars - Sequences
 
Anton Kellner and The Lone Stars - Sequences
Record Label: Self-released
Release Date: Nov. 27, 2012

So there's this dude Anton Kellner who has this band The Lone Stars and they play music in and around the Chicagoland area. Though they're pretty much unknown, that very fact is about to change. Sequences is their debut LP and hot damn is it something. The disc opens with the title track, a minute-long foray into jangle indie roots-folk. Its a perfect opening salvo and a great introduction to the music of Kellner and the Stars.

A delicate piano, lilting violin and Kellner's self assured vocals open "Won't Come Back This Time," a polished and sturdy jaunt buttressed by a gorgeous lap steel. Kellner and Co. up the sonic ante on "Staining," which is both more urgent and fractious than any of the prior two. In some ways, the song is spiky, especially when Kellner sings "Why do we keep staining the glass of our love?"

Every disc has an apex moment and Sequences thankfully has quite a few. None however are better than "Recaption," a gorgeous acoustic ballad in which Kellner's voice is as soothing and affecting as anyone else out there. Classic and timeless, the song finds comfort in a forlorn lover that is spent from weariness and desperation. In terms of sentiment, it's an easy place to relate to and that sense of familiarity is what makes the song so well worth it. Over solacing piano, Kellner sings "Milestones and heartache, I'm landlocked, l'm losing you again."

The buoyancy of "Stained," is revisited in the rollicking country sendup "Disappear, Me," a jangle and ringing affair that is anchored by a rousing organ solo. Penultimate cut "The Blues We Sang in Memphis," is a gauzy piano interlude and a bridge to album closer "Stop Running (Far Away)," a five-minute piano ballad that is rustic, ruminative and ultimately very rewarding. Straddling the line between The Eagles and City and Colour, "Stop Running," is an arresting and deeply affecting song and veritable proof that Kellner is a rising new talent to keep an eye on.

Recommended If You Like City and Colour, Ryan Adams, The Eagles, alt. country


Find Him Here https://www.facebook.com/AntonKellnerAndTheLoneStars

Daniel Thompson 12/01/12 11:12 AM

a good dude who makes amazing music. this album is great.