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Farewell Flight - I Was a Ghost Album Cover
Author's Rating
Vocals 8.5
Musicianship 8.5
Lyrics 8.5
Production 8.5
Creativity 8.5
Lasting Value 8.5
Reviewer Tilt 8.5
Final Verdict: 85%
Member Ratings
Vocals 5.75
Musicianship 5.25
Lyrics 5.58
Production 5.25
Creativity 5.75
Lasting Value 5.42
Reviewer Tilt 5.92
Average: 56%
Inside AP.net

Farewell Flight - I Was a Ghost

Reviewed by: Gregory Robson (03/10/14)
Farewell Flight - I Was a Ghost
Record Label: Self-released
Release Date: March 4, 2014

Well, this album is long overdue.

Four years since their last album, much has changed in the Farewell Flight camp. For starters, the band relocated to Nashville and only founding member Luke Foley remains from the original lineup. Rabbit Campbell, who joined the band in 2008 is still there, as is Caleb Allensworth, who linked up with Campbell and Foley in 2012. Since relocating to Nashville, Foley has since married so the band’s output of whiskey-soaked Adam Duritz-esque confessionals are long gone. But given all that, the band is still firmly committed to writing first-rate emotionally-driven indie rock. On their latest disc, I Was a Ghost, the band has written some of their finest material to date and proven that despite the long layoff they are more than ready to conquer the Southeast and beyond.

The album opens with the warm introspection of “Scarecrow,” a song that captivates from the very first notes and almost immediately makes its case as one of the best songs the band has written to date. Very quickly, the song segues into an arena-ready, power-packed, top-down rocker. For the first time as frontman for Farewell Flight, Foley sounds possessed, charged up and absolutely ready to hit make a statement. The song is equal parts angry, visceral and wholly convincing. A searing solo by Campbell at the 2:15 only accelerates the song even further. Perhaps this layoff was not a bad thing after all.

A wash of synths opens the shimmery, danceable cut “Breaking My Heart,” another fiery and propulsive cut that once again finds Foley singing with an tenacity, conviction and a sense of ballast that has long been missing from the band’s reedy output. Whereas the band’s previous discography was woven with introspection, yearning and open-hearted meandering, their output this time around feels more honed in, more locked down and more cohesive. While the immaculate production of Steve Wilson deserves much of the credit, the song absolutely screams stadium tours.

More synths enter on the sprite and kinetic “Teenager,” a confident, crisp and wholly engrossing work of guitar-driven mood rock that sizzles and sears from the very first verses. If “Teenager” has any lasting power it’s the candor of Foley’s confessions, most notably when he sings, “I forgot how to pray, I used to do it so well.” A wall of oh-oh-oh’s insert themselves halfway through and the song carries forward with a bombastic swagger that almost feels as if it is trying to demolish the band’s discography to date. There’s such a concussive and hard-hitting aspect to all of the songs that allows the impact to be felt from the onset. Whereas previous Farewell Flight songs could take a few listens before making a dent, everything on I Was a Ghost is impacting from the very first seconds.

The warm introspection from the opening of “Scarecrow” returns on the band’s lead single “Everything Changed,” a melodic knot of romance, conviction and polish that powers the disc forward with rugged authority. That same sense of bombast and density is once again front and center and Foley and Co. sound like a band wholly committed to making a sizable dent on the Southeast music scene and beyond. The trio attempts to change things up on the folk-driven “The Places We’ll Go,” a vernal yarn that seems tailor-made for a summer road trip. Once used during a Citgo ad campaign, the song lends itself perfectly to teenage wanderlust and college-aged exploration. In truth, the song sort of feels misguided and tacked on here as the sonic landscape just doesn’t mesh with the rest of material. Everything else on I Was a Ghost feels visceral, thumping, emotional and “The Places We’ll Go” is light and feathery.

Penultimate cut and title track “I Was a Ghost” is arguably the best song Farewell Flight has written to date. Everyone has had nights that seemed endless, limitless and infinite and “I Was a Ghost” is the soundtrack to that night. Uplifting, ebullient and deeply inspiring, “I Was a Ghost” is just the latest reason that Farewell Flight is a band that needs to be on your radar. The album concludes with the mid-tempo “Heyo,” an uneven effort that doesn’t find its footing until the latter stages. While Foley usually takes center stage on most songs, drummer Caleb Allensworth firmly sits front and center on this one.

If I Was a Ghost has any negatives it’s that after a four year layoff, the best the band could do is seven songs. Brevity is commendable and all but after such a long layoff, only offering seven songs feels a bit shortsighted. Not only that there’s nary a piano ballad and no sense of the spartan songwriting that made the band’s previous albums so heartfelt and engaging. Those small gripes aside, I Was a Ghost is a brilliant work from a band that still finds itself way under the radar. But just maybe this will be the album to change all that.

Recommended If You Like Vega4, Snow Patrol, The Killers


Farewell Flight is Luke Foley: vocals, guitar, piano, songwriting
Caleb Allensworth: drums
Rabbit Campbell: guitar, keys, et al


Tracklisting 1. Scarecrow (4:05)
2. Breaking My Heart (4:29)
3. Teenager (4:49)
4. Everything Changed (4:18)
5. The Places We’ll Go (3:35)
6. I Was a Ghost (4:23)
7. Heyo (4:21)

Produced by Steve Wilson (The Class of 98, The Juliana Theory, Hawk Nelson)


Find Them Here http://www.FarewellFlight.com
 
Displaying posts 1 - 6 of 6
09:50 AM on 03/10/14
#2
luvsickcatalyst
wander eyes, ocean high.
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I absolutely loved Sound, Color, Motion and expected big things to come for them...but "Places We'll Go" is one of the biggest Mumford & Sons-esque pandering ripoffs I've heard from a band I liked. I didn't really dig the other new song I heard, so should I give this a shot if I'm not really into the whole pop-folk sound?
10:05 AM on 03/10/14
#3
Gregory Robson
Under Rug Swept
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I absolutely loved Sound, Color, Motion and expected big things to come for them...but "Places We'll Go" is one of the biggest Mumford & Sons-esque pandering ripoffs I've heard from a band I liked. I didn't really dig the other new song I heard, so should I give this a shot if I'm not really into the whole pop-folk sound?
It's the only pop-folk song on the album. This is a harder-hitting version of Sound.Color.Motion.
09:01 AM on 03/11/14
#4
Nardes
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Ordered this from them... and I'm lovin it. Too bad Mono Vs. Stereo couldn't do more for them, and things happened/ended the way they did
04:05 PM on 03/13/14
#5
...atfirstsight
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I firmly believe this is what the latest Relient K record should have sounded like... It's all the best parts of Sound, Color, Motion; only packaged perfectly for Top-40 radio.
08:55 AM on 03/14/14
#6
Gregory Robson
Under Rug Swept
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I firmly believe this is what the latest Relient K record should have sounded like... It's all the best parts of Sound, Color, Motion; only packaged perfectly for Top-40 radio.
Well said.
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