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Jeroan Drive - The Stones Remain in Silence Album Cover
Author's Rating
Vocals 8
Musicianship 8
Lyrics 7
Production 7
Creativity 7.75
Lasting Value 7.75
Reviewer Tilt 8
Final Verdict: 76%
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Jeroan Drive - The Stones Remain in Silence

Reviewed by: OKComputer1016 (06/18/08)
Jeroan Drive - The Stones Remain in Silence
Record Label: Yesterday’s Gone Records
Release Date: February 11, 2008


Just picture that: The Stones Remain in Silence. Stones. Being quiet. I’ve got no idea what it means - stones don’t usually move (or talk) - but I assume you’re probably very creeped out already.

Or at least you ought to be. Jeroan Drive’s music is just as mysterious and haunting as the ambiguous title, which is a huge plus in this field of music. Sometimes they overshoot their goal and end up with plain cheesiness (like the black-metal keys that open the album), but for the most part, each track is sufficiently hair-raising to a certain extent.

The group’s brand of dark post-hardcore crawls along painfully at times like pg99, but generally gallops like Born Against’s distant emo cousin. The vocals are perfectly obnoxious; they could be backups for The Blood Brothers. Unlike the Blood Brothers however, there’s no comedic edge - just outrage and plenty of it.

The production is pretty weird for a hardcore album. There are a couple instances of the band dropping out, leaving just a strumming guitar as in “11:47 at the Laundry Service.” It’s sort of a cool effect... if you’re a 70’s arena rock group and you hate sounding good live. Luckily, this dynamic clash takes away from the overall playback only slightly - the songs are pretty tight altogether.

You could argue that there are some predictable moments on the album but aside from the slow, breakdown-y discords of “Kill the Cardinal,” Jeroan Drive do a great job of putting some of the real wave of screamo (Majority Rule, pg.99) back into the current (wrong) definition of the genre. If it sounds familiar to you, at least it sounds great. And if it sounds familiar to you, then you have great taste in music.

A highlight of the album is the bizarrely titled “Heart. My. Get. On,” which slows down the pace toward the end of the album. Including a solitary mellow song on the second half of the album is one of the biggest clichés in metalcore right now, so I was skeptical when I first heard the track, but be sure it’d be a shame to overlook this one. These light verses build into an explosive, almost Jane Doe-esque chorus that would warrant singing along if you had a clue what they were saying.

Whether or not you’re into this type of music, The Stones Remain in Silence is pretty terrifying. Jeroan Drive knows that there’s a good way to do screamo and a bad way to do screamo, and they do it right. Certainly worth a listen.

Recommended if You LikePg.99, Hiretsukan, The Bled

myspace.com/jeroandrive
 
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