AbsolutePunk.net
   Username
Password
Money News
Hint: Have a news tip? Submit us news.
Money
Inside AP.net

A New Model for Music: Big Bands, Big Brands

Posted by: Jason Tate (03/19/14)
David Carr writing for the NY Times on the current state of the cross section of brands and music:
And in a move that might seem redundant given the irony that she had already coated herself with, Lady Gaga invited the performance artist Millie Brown on stage to drink a bottle of neon green liquid and vomit all over her. Her actions to happily shill for Doritos, then deliver a lecture on the importance of independent thought perfectly encapsulate the conflicted state of the industry.
  
 
Displaying posts 1 - 8 of 8
09:00 PM on 03/19/14
#2
incognitojones
http://auburn-hills.tumblr.com
Offline
User Info.
incognitojones's Avatar
Interesting piece. I think its inevitable for advertising to fund artists down the line, but I'm not sure brands like Dorito's are getting that much benefit from this added exposure.
01:51 AM on 03/20/14
#3
wrothish
I fall to my knees
Offline
User Info.
No Avatar Selected
Thinking back on the frothy response to things like Gap's Ryan Adams/Willie Nelson commercial and MM's Gravity Rides Everything Nissan spot, it's fascinating to see things like corporate sponsorship of festivals and the mostly positive response to Lorde's MAC makeup line announcement.

I certainly prefer this lack of concern to the belligerent cred policing of the 90s because the Western tradition of art was underwritten by patrons. The most "elite" realms of art still are. Audience preoccupation with popular musicians' source of revenue as a barometer of authenticity seems to coincide with music becoming an accessory or tool of self-definition, much like not wanting to encounter an identical outfit at a party.

As the new revenue model for music takes form, it's certainly possible that the "blockbuster movie" effect Carr mentions could stifle artists... but a lot of those blockbuster-making studios own art-house film companies, just as a lot of important small labels have historically had a major label parent. It's probably going to work out exactly as it has for centuries: there will be some well-regarded and poorly-regarded artists earning a large amount, more of both groups not earning much, and fans will be arguing about who deserves what.
07:31 AM on 03/20/14
#4
icynova
Love is easier made than kept!
Offline
User Info.
icynova's Avatar
Thinking back on the frothy response to things like Gap's Ryan Adams/Willie Nelson commercial and MM's Gravity Rides Everything Nissan spot, it's fascinating to see things like corporate sponsorship of festivals and the mostly positive response to Lorde's MAC makeup line announcement.

I certainly prefer this lack of concern to the belligerent cred policing of the 90s because the Western tradition of art was underwritten by patrons. The most "elite" realms of art still are. Audience preoccupation with popular musicians' source of revenue as a barometer of authenticity seems to coincide with music becoming an accessory or tool of self-definition, much like not wanting to encounter an identical outfit at a party.

As the new revenue model for music takes form, it's certainly possible that the "blockbuster movie" effect Carr mentions could stifle artists... but a lot of those blockbuster-making studios own art-house film companies, just as a lot of important small labels have historically had a major label parent. It's probably going to work out exactly as it has for centuries: there will be some well-regarded and poorly-regarded artists earning a large amount, more of both groups not earning much, and fans will be arguing about who deserves what.

Whoa, a thoughtful response on AP.net? this took me by surprise. I tend to agree with you though, good post.
09:54 AM on 03/20/14
#5
Arry
apreeesh
Offline
User Info.
Arry's Avatar
it's definitely an exciting time to be in advertising. you have consumers not minding that they're being sold too, as long as it doesn't interrupt the atmosphere. and you have big brands taking a big step, not being afraid to be weird. i think this whole increased brand loyalty is also due to the fact that a lot of corporate brands are shedding the "fortune 400, scary big brand" skin, and embracing the humanistic relationship between the consumer and brand. i mean, thanks to social media, big brands are taking the step to actually talk to their consumers, which makes the consumer trust the brand even more.

this is a good read, i always thought that more artists are agreeing to sponsorships, because the brand allows them to be unfiltered.
03:24 PM on 03/20/14
#6
Uncalled Four
Regular Member
Offline
User Info.
No Avatar Selected
I liked him when he played for the Houston Texans. He's definitely taken a change of course writing articles for the NY Times, but good for him. I'm definitely looking forward to seeing where his brother gets drafted. Go Bulldogs!
05:08 PM on 03/20/14
#7
DItaliaO
Registered User
Offline
User Info.
DItaliaO's Avatar
I liked him when he played for the Houston Texans. He's definitely taken a change of course writing articles for the NY Times, but good for him. I'm definitely looking forward to seeing where his brother gets drafted. Go Bulldogs!
Lol I don't know if youre joking, but it's not the same David Carr
10:54 AM on 03/21/14
#8
rawesome
Listen to Dave Hause pls
Offline
User Info.
rawesome's Avatar
Welp, alright.
Options
Related News Stories

NEWS, MUSIC & MORE
Search News
Release Dates
Exclusives
Best New Music
Articles
CONNECT
Submit News
Forums
Contests
Mobile Version
AP.net Logos
HIDDEN TREASURES
AbsolutePunk Podcast
Free Music
Sports Forum
Technology Forum
Recommendations
INFORMATION
Advertising
Contact Us
Copyright Policy
Terms of Service
Privacy Policy
FOLLOW
Twitter | Facebook | RSS
PropertyOfZack
PunkNews.org
UnderTheGun
Chorus.fm