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Displaying posts 30 - 45 of 49.
12:40 PM on 06/06/11
Spencer Control
Now we are all sons of bitches
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First - This record is absolutely awesome. Currently number two on my AOTY list.
Second - I think it's both the way of the future, but it's definitely a rare occurrence because the industry's not quite there yet. Everyday is still a struggle with labels, cloud service, file sharing, bootlegging, etc. I think down the road, bands won't need labels, but to do it now and be as successful as they have it shows that what I personally believe about bands is still true... you have to be good. They wouldn't be nearly as successful as they are if they weren't as good as they are.
This. Out of curiosity, what's the first?
12:47 PM on 06/06/11
SLoT
Stage three has begun.
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This. Out of curiosity, what's the first?
I Can Make A Mess - Gold Rush. Both have been competing with Mansions - Dig Up the Dead as the top three has changed a few times.
12:59 PM on 06/06/11
Matthew Tsai
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For years, every time someone succeeds in music outside the traditional model, people [legacy players and adherents] have been quick to claim them exceptions to the rule. But exceptions pile up.

To me, major labels are kind of like religions -- archaic monoliths that are (rather uncomfortably) trying to adapt and find their place in a world that doesn't really need them anymore. Sure, they still have their uses and steadfast believers, but more and more are figuring out how to get along just fine without 'em.

(Not trying to start some theological debate here; I just think it's an apt comparison.)

Hmm, I think your analysis of religion is close-minded and misses the mark, but I think you may have a point in applying that description to labels. I don't agree that religion and labels are in any way comparable in the direction you're trying to go in, but yeah, guess it's kind of hard to get into why without getting into a theological debate
01:01 PM on 06/06/11
InTheatersNow
Suck My Balls
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Haven't heard them, but that is great.
01:16 PM on 06/06/11
reid
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I really don't see how "practice and practice" has any relevance to what I said. They are clearly talented musicians and I love their album (and I loved their EP and tried to get everyone I knew to listen to it), but they've had a lot of things line up for them in order to get their album to the point of popularity that it is at right now. I'm absolutely elated that they have found a greatly deserved amount of success. I'm giving them credit. My point was that this will not be the norm. Most great bands will toil in obscurity without the recognition they deserve.

I do disagree with your idea that people listen to a "practiced" and "refined" band if they are recommended to. It's been my experience that most people tend to listen only to whatever crap is most convenient and hardly make any effort to listen to a recommended performer outside the realm of what they are already complacent with. Most people don't care about original music unless it flies directly into their line of site.
i'm saying it's not the exposure from ads/plays/syncs/etc. just bc you're in a commercial or have a good tv spot doesn't mean you'll pull in sales from it. you will some, but not a ton. unless the music is really good. people talk about good music w/ passion. passion is contagious. that's where real fans (and in turn, sales) come from.
01:22 PM on 06/06/11
DandonTRJ
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Hmm, I think your analysis of religion is close-minded and misses the mark, but I think you may have a point in applying that description to labels. I don't agree that religion and labels are in any way comparable in the direction you're trying to go in, but yeah, guess it's kind of hard to get into why without getting into a theological debate
I would be close-minded if I said religion was useless. I'll parse it out a little further.

So back in the day, religion was a tool used to maintain order within society, tempering man's baser instincts with the threat of heavenly reproach if he didn't straighten up and fly right. Of course it had spiritual applications, as it still does, but those were secondary to its Hobbesian utility. But as the rule of law has taken over and people are more susceptible to morality from a humanist standpoint, religion's societal utility has arguably become more limited -- the spiritual application primarily, the societal glue secondarily.

Taking that analysis at face value, major labels were primarily gatekeepers back in the day, constituting the vast majority of the music industry. They did artist development, sure, but that was a secondary function of the monopolistic system they ran. Now that distribution within the industry no longer requires gatekeepers, the majors are transitioning into primarily being tastemakers and publicists. This is useful if you want to be a platinum selling artist, but if you're just looking to make a living off music, there are much easier routes to take, such as indie labels or DIY. So sure, the majors still have their place, but they're increasingly irrelevant to many artists as they find ways to independently obtain what the monoliths used to provide.

Conclusion: Saying an artist needs a label to succeed is like saying society needs religion to keep it from descending into chaos. There are much more efficient ways to accomplish those goals now. This, again, is not to say those titans now lack all purpose; they've just become more limited in scope.
01:40 PM on 06/06/11
Matthew Tsai
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I would be close-minded if I said religion was useless. I'll parse it out a little further.

So back in the day, religion was a tool used to maintain order within society, tempering man's baser instincts with the threat of heavenly reproach if he didn't straighten up and fly right. Of course it had spiritual applications, as it still does, but those were secondary to its Hobbesian utility. But as the rule of law has taken over and people are more susceptible to morality from a humanist standpoint, religion's societal utility has arguably become more limited -- the spiritual application primarily, the societal glue secondarily.

Taking that analysis at face value, major labels were primarily gatekeepers back in the day, constituting the vast majority of the music industry. They did artist development, sure, but that was a secondary function of the monopolistic system they ran. Now that distribution within the industry no longer requires gatekeepers, the majors are transitioning into primarily being tastemakers and publicists. This is useful if you want to be a platinum selling artist, but if you're just looking to make a living off music, there are much easier routes to take, such as indie labels or DIY. So sure, the majors still have their place, but they're increasingly irrelevant to many artists as they find ways to independently obtain what the monoliths used to provide.

Conclusion: Saying an artist needs a label to succeed is like saying society needs religion to keep it from descending into chaos. There are much more efficient ways to accomplish those goals now. This, again, is not to say those titans now lack all purpose; they've just become more limited in scope.
Thanks for the clarification. It definitely makes more sense now in terms of what you were trying to say. I don't agree with everything you said, namely that religion's societal utility has become more limited. Ultimately, I think that's an illusion, as there are facets of morality and religion that are inseparable. A religion-less society is possible, but the pull of morality will never be as strong in such a society as if religion was present, if for no other reason than that scientifically speaking, our brains seem to be wired for religion and that a lot of humanity responds best to the need to "be moral" when religion is present.

But I'm going on a huge tangent from the topic at hand here, so I'm going to stop haha. I'm definitely open to discussing this with you elsewhere though!
01:43 PM on 06/06/11
theotheryabs
There's a Melody in Everything
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I feel bad for saying this, but....who?
01:52 PM on 06/06/11
percussionguita
Great Gatz! It's Matt.
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Aww Yeah!!! The South and Alabama representin'
02:37 PM on 06/06/11
MichaelShore
"Family Love Michael"
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This is an example of a fantastic album, a great band, and a lot of word of mouth and support from fans who recognized and spread word about a fantastic band putting out high-quality music. Whether this is the future of the business or not, it's something bands and labels should look at as a model for future albums and releases.
02:41 PM on 06/06/11
TheDeathofParis
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This is not a fluke or is it something that is the future of the music industry. A label helps build a unknown artist a fan base and funds an artist. A label also uses its contacts to break the artist further.... When an artist like The Civil Wars has a member in the band who was signed to a label since the age of 17 and had 2 releases which sold 250,000 if not more and developed a fan base. Then went ahead and signed a publishing deal and had american idol winners sing her songs and get paid off that. Joy started her own label which she was able to fund. She already had the fan base. No one noticed the fact that The Civil Wars recorded their first songs with a major producer in an expensive studio. Their 2nd show was opening for a major artist in a popular club. They used all the right contacts to get on good shows and grow quickly and they also used their contacts to get on Grey's Anatomy and other shows. I'm not taking away from the fact that these 2 are super talented but they were already established in the industry and funded their own new project.

Its the same reason bands like Less Than Jake don't need a label. They were developed by a major label and grew a fan base over the years through all the marketing and awesome tours the major label put them on. People might forget but Less Than Jake toured with BonJovi playing stadiums. Now they are able to record cheap and sell their music and merch to the die hard fan base that stayed with them over the last few years. Yeah bands like that don't need a label to do what they do, play good shows, release music and tour. Bands who don't have money though or a large fan base from a previous project and are starting out from scratch will have a lot of trouble getting to the position that Less Than Jake and The Civil Wars are finding themselves in right now..... Just something to think about.
03:12 PM on 06/06/11
trappedintime
Yea, you were right about me
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Love these guys. Congrats on their accomplishments.
06:19 PM on 06/06/11
swimhockey
The Times We Felt ALIVE
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I hope this is the future. That'd be awesome.
06:33 PM on 06/06/11
ihaveblink
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This is not a fluke or is it something that is the future of the music industry. A label helps build a unknown artist a fan base and funds an artist. A label also uses its contacts to break the artist further.... When an artist like The Civil Wars has a member in the band who was signed to a label since the age of 17 and had 2 releases which sold 250,000 if not more and developed a fan base. Then went ahead and signed a publishing deal and had american idol winners sing her songs and get paid off that. Joy started her own label which she was able to fund. She already had the fan base. No one noticed the fact that The Civil Wars recorded their first songs with a major producer in an expensive studio. Their 2nd show was opening for a major artist in a popular club. They used all the right contacts to get on good shows and grow quickly and they also used their contacts to get on Grey's Anatomy and other shows. I'm not taking away from the fact that these 2 are super talented but they were already established in the industry and funded their own new project.

Its the same reason bands like Less Than Jake don't need a label. They were developed by a major label and grew a fan base over the years through all the marketing and awesome tours the major label put them on. People might forget but Less Than Jake toured with BonJovi playing stadiums. Now they are able to record cheap and sell their music and merch to the die hard fan base that stayed with them over the last few years. Yeah bands like that don't need a label to do what they do, play good shows, release music and tour. Bands who don't have money though or a large fan base from a previous project and are starting out from scratch will have a lot of trouble getting to the position that Less Than Jake and The Civil Wars are finding themselves in right now..... Just something to think about.
Exactly, people are treating them like they slugged it out in clubs for years, toured their hearts out, somehow found the money to record and somehow got all these breaks. It's a very calculated maneuver on their part, and so far it's worked. It's not like some complete unkowns either.
07:17 PM on 06/06/11
TheDeathofParis
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Exactly, people are treating them like they slugged it out in clubs for years, toured their hearts out, somehow found the money to record and somehow got all these breaks. It's a very calculated maneuver on their part, and so far it's worked. It's not like some complete unkowns either.
very calculated. grey's anatomy help fund things but it didn't help break the band. Them being on grey's anatomy and on late night tv and getting press about how they are unsigned and changing the music industry and them touring with popular artists and playing good shows is what is selling those records. The complete unknowns don't grow this fast with out some kind of $$$ funding or small label doing marketing for them and them playing decent shows. If you look closely at any artist who's big now and you see how they got started you'll find that there was always someone funding the band or breaking the band. Greenday was on a tiny label that's why they were touring non stop, bonjovi's parent's refinanced their house to put money into the band, say anything talks about how their parents are well off and funded them from the start, medina lake won $50k on the fear factor, gym class hero's won the lottery, everyone had someone breaking them... either funding them or a club manager, promoter, small label was breaking the band.... Its very hard and nearly impossible to break no matter how good your music is. There is always an outside factor! I wish people would realize this and give credit to the bands that actually go out there and bust their asses and really diserve to be recognized.
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